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International Conference on Medicinal Chemistry, will be organized around the theme “A Perspective on Past and Future Medicinal Chemistry”

Euro Medicinal Chemistry 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Euro Medicinal Chemistry 2019

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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The pharmaceutical industry has bump into substantial difficulties in its efforts to withstand the productivity and profitability of drug discovery during the process of discovering novel drug targets. The pharmaceutical industry which is mainly of research-based plays an exclusive role in the discovery and development of new medicines and vaccines to prevent and treat diseases or disorders and thereby improving the lives and health of the patients throughout the world. It has given its key contribution to global health and is turning fundamental research into innovative treatments. Industry’s success relies on continuous innovation for the prevention and treatment of common health problems, complex medical emergencies, and neglected diseases, and for improvements in existing treatments. Existing Drug Targets purposes to cover the modern and most outstanding expansions on the medicinal chemistry and pharmacology of the discovered and developed molecular drug targets. For example, is the disease specific proteins, receptors, enzymes, genes.

 

  • Track 1-1Targeted Protein Degradation
  • Track 1-2DNA Encoded Libraries
  • Track 1-3Hit-to-Lead Optimization
  • Track 1-4Predictive Toxicology – Improving Compound Safety
  • Track 1-5Small Molecule Immuno-Oncology
  • Track 1-6Artificial Intelligence in Medicinal Chemistry
  • Track 1-7Optimizing Outsourcing Activities

Drug Discovery is the identification and documentation of novel active chemical compounds. The identified novel active chemical compounds are called as "hits", which are typically found by assaying of the chemical compounds for a desired biological activity. The discovery of new generation antimicrobials against multidrug resistant strains of bacteria such as tuberculosis is advancing by extensive use of those modern tools. Natural products chemistry has been re-emerging as a highly promising provider of the sufficiently sophisticated lead structures for drug discovery. “Structural biology”, “computational biology”, “chemical biology”, and “chemical genetics” are now fully incorporated into modern drug discovery through target-based approaches.

 

  • Track 2-1Fragment-Based Drug Discovery
  • Track 2-2Macrocyclics & Constrained Peptides
  • Track 2-3Biophysical Approaches for Drug Discovery
  • Track 2-4Small Molecules for Cancer Immunotherapy
  • Track 2-5Inflammation Inhibitors
  • Track 2-6Kinase Inhibitor Chemistry
  • Track 2-7Blood-Brain Penetrate Inhibitors
  • Track 2-8GPCR-Targeted Drug Design
  • Track 2-9Protein-Protein Interactions
  • Track 3-1Biomolecules
  • Track 3-2Preparation of Natural products
  • Track 3-3Metal Complexes creation
  • Track 3-4Asymmetric synthesis
  • Track 3-5Organometallic chemistry
  • Track 3-6Nucleotide chemistry
  • Track 3-7Chemogenomics and Chemical Biology for Target Identification and Validation
  • Track 3-8 Assemblies of macrolide-mimetics
  • Track 3-9Spiro– medium- and large(macro) heterocyclic systems
  • Track 3-10 Isosteric replacements of amino acids, di-/tri-peptides
  • Track 4-1ADCs – Targeted delivery
  • Track 4-2Immuno-oncology
  • Track 4-3Small-molecule targeting of RNAs
  • Track 4-4Preventative Toxicology
  • Track 4-5Phenotypic screening
  • Track 4-6SBDD Case studies
  • Track 4-7Molecules with predictable in vivo and safety profiles
  • Track 4-8Macrocyclic compounds
  • Track 5-1Receptor theory
  • Track 5-2Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry
  • Track 5-3Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics
  • Track 5-4Steepest Descent Method
  • Track 5-5Conjugate Gradient Method
  • Track 5-6 Structure-Based Computer-Aided Drug Design
  • Track 5-7Ligand-Based Computer-Aided Drug Design
  • Track 5-8Molecular Docking
  • Track 5-9Database Searching
  • Track 5-10de novo Drug Design
  • Track 6-1Bioanalytical Techniques
  • Track 6-2Hyphenated Techniques
  • Track 6-3Chromatography Methods
  • Track 6-4Electrophoresis
  • Track 6-5Ligand Binding Assays
  • Track 6-6Mass Spectrometry
  • Track 6-7Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
  • Track 6-8Sample preparation and extraction
  • Track 6-9Natural Products Synthesis
  • Track 6-10Synthetic methodology
  • Track 6-11Catalysis
  • Track 6-12New synthetic technologies
  • Track 6-13Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology
  • Track 6-14Synthesis of nano and functionalized Materials

“Drug discovery” has historically been a stronghold of chemistry, especially natural products chemistry and synthetic organic chemistry. Chemistry is thus inherently well-positioned to have a major impact on drug discovery, since other disciplines cannot create novel small molecules. In other words, “drug discovery and development” cannot happen without chemists.

 

  • Track 7-1Targeted protein degradation / PROTACs
  • Track 7-2DNA Encoded Libraries
  • Track 7-3Hit-to-Lead Optimization
  • Track 7-4Predictive Toxicology – Improving Compound Safety
  • Track 7-5Artificial Intelligence in Medicinal Chemistry
  • Track 7-6Optimizing Outsourcing Activities
  • Track 8-1Drug Discovery Chemistry – where are we heading
  • Track 8-2Target Validation using Medicinal Chemistry tools
  • Track 8-3Optimizing hit to lead optimization quality and timescale
  • Track 8-4Best Practice Case Studies
  • Track 8-5Data for decision making
  • Track 8-6Protein Degradation Strategies
  • Track 8-7Future of Medicinal Chemistry
  • Track 9-1Kinase Inhibitors
  • Track 9-2Approaches to Optimization and Characterization
  • Track 9-3Inhibitors for Rare Diseases
  • Track 9-4Recent Advances in Screening Approaches to Lead Identification
  • Track 9-5Novel Approaches to Anti-Infective Drug Discovery and Liver Disease
  • Track 9-6Targeting RNA
  • Track 9-7Macrocycles in Drug Design
  • Track 9-8Advances in Targeting Immuno-Inflammation
  • Track 9-9Synthesis Applications and ADME in Drug Discovery
  • Track 10-1Frontiers in Catalysis
  • Track 10-2Aggressive Bond Disconnections in Total Synthesis
  • Track 10-3Chemical Probes for Characterizing Biology
  • Track 10-4Synthetic Biology for Natural Products
  • Track 10-5Advances in Drug Discovery
  • Track 10-6Natural Product Discovery and Biosynthesis
  • Track 10-7Combining Synthesis and Biosynthesis to Construct Complex Molecules
  • Track 10-8New Directions in Antibiotic Discovery and Development
  • Track 10-9Accessing Complex Molecules
  • Track 10-10Structure-biodegradability relationship
  • Track 10-11Diversity-Oriented Synthesis

The synthesis of each molecule was first carried out on a small scale (probably milligrams) in the laboratory, followed much later by development of safe, efficient, and scalable methods to provide kilograms of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) that was incorporated into dosage forms for administration to patients. It is critical to point out that an early step in the complex process of drug discovery was the synthesis of a molecule that tested a hypothesis faced by the project team. This required a medicinal chemist to use organic chemistry training and experience to conceive of a compound and then employ appropriate reactions to furnish the desired target and synthesize a suitable number of derivatives to optimize the spectrum of properties associated with drug like candidates.

  • Track 11-1New reagents, strategies, catalysts and concepts for organic synthesis
  • Track 11-2Mechanistic organic chemistry
  • Track 11-3Computational chemistry
  • Track 11-4Supramolecular chemistry
  • Track 11-5Medicinal chemistry
  • Track 11-6Drug discovery
  • Track 11-7Total synthesis of natural products
  • Track 11-8Heterocyclic compounds
  • Track 11-9Synthesis and functional properties of molecules
  • Track 11-10Asymmetric synthesis
  • Track 11-11Green chemistry
  • Track 12-1Organocatalysis
  • Track 12-2Flow-chemistry approaches to the synthesis of key targets
  • Track 12-3Applications of organometallic compounds in synthesis and catalysis
  • Track 12-4Stereoselective synthesis
  • Track 12-5Synthesis and property of functional molecules and organic materials
  • Track 12-6Sustainable and Green synthetic and catalytic methods
  • Track 12-7Process development of key pharmaceutical targets
  • Track 12-8Synthesis in Medicinal chemistry and chemical biology
  • Track 12-9Biocatalysis in synthesis
  • Track 12-10Computational tools for synthesis and catalysis
  • Track 12-11Polymer synthesis
  • Track 13-1Addressing Preclinical Toxicity
  • Track 13-2Advances in Lead Generation
  • Track 13-3Advances in Synthetic Methods
  • Track 13-4Alternative Modalities
  • Track 13-5Challenges and Opportunities in Fragment Based Drug Discovery
  • Track 13-6Chemical Biology in Drug and Target Discovery
  • Track 13-7Drug Discovery Tales
  • Track 13-8Late Stage Functionalization
  • Track 13-9High pressure cryogenic reactions
  • Track 13-10Enzymatic reactions
  • Track 13-11Cascade addition-cyclization
  • Track 13-12Multi-component reactions
  • Track 13-13One-pot Syntheses
  • Track 14-1Structural and in-Silico Chemistry
  • Track 14-2Chemical Biology for Drug Discovery
  • Track 14-3Pain Medications and their SAR
  • Track 14-4Recent Advances in Targeting Autophagy
  • Track 14-5Photo-redox Catalysis
  • Track 14-6Advances in Synthesis and Medicinal Chemistry
  • Track 15-1Design, manufacture and use of efficacious dosage forms
  • Track 15-2Types of Formulation: Enteral, Parenteral and Topical
  • Track 15-3Water-miscible formulations
  • Track 15-4Other formulations
  • Track 15-5Pesticide formulation
  • Track 15-6Recent Developments in Dosage Form Design
  • Track 15-7Establishing the Bioequivalence of Pharmaceutical Products
  • Track 16-1ADME (adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion)Of drugs
  • Track 16-2Metabolism and toxicology
  • Track 16-3Antiviral and antimicrobial activity
  • Track 16-4Drug receptor interaction
  • Track 16-5Kojic acid as a tyrosine inhibitor
  • Track 16-6Components of ADME
  • Track 16-7Pharmacokinetics and process of ADME
  • Track 17-1Analytical Techniques for Clinical Chemistry
  • Track 17-2Chemical Analysis
  • Track 17-3Electrochemical Analysis
  • Track 17-4Spectroscopy
  • Track 17-5Separation Techniques
  • Track 18-1Foundation in Paediatric Pharmaceutical Care
  • Track 18-2Equipment and Technologies for the Pharmaceutical Industry
  • Track 18-3Validation & Transfer of Methods for Biopharmaceutical Analysis
  • Track 18-4Stability and Shelf-life of Pharmaceuticals
  • Track 18-5Pharmaceutical Microbiology
  • Track 18-6Corporate Compliance & Transparency in the Pharmaceutical Industry
  • Track 19-1Rational Prescribing
  • Track 19-2Adverse drug effects
  • Track 19-3Drug interactions
  • Track 19-4Drug Development
  • Track 19-5Pharmacogenomics
  • Track 19-6Structure-guided Drug Design
  • Track 19-7Molecular Cloning of Drug Targets
  • Track 19-8Cellular Basis of Pharmacokinetics
  • Track 19-9Cellular Basis of Pharmacokinetics
  • Track 19-10Receptors and Modulation of Their Response
  • Track 19-11Drug–Receptor Interactions
  • Track 19-12G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
  • Track 19-13Pharmacology of Transcription
  • Track 19-14Intercellular communication
  • Track 19-15Pharmacology of defense process

The role of organic chemistry in the pharmaceutical development of novel drug molecules continues to be one of the key drivers in the process of drug discovery and new drug targets. However, the precise nature of that role played by organic chemistry is undergoing a visible change, not only because of the new synthetic methods and but also by the technologies now available to the synthetic chemist as well as the medicinal chemist, but also in numerous key areas, particularly in drug metabolism and chemical toxicology. Medicinal chemists around the world deal with more rapid turnaround of testing the data of molecules that influences their day-to-day decisions.

  • Track 20-1Virtual Screening
  • Track 20-2QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship)
  • Track 20-3Target Structure-Based Design
  • Track 20-4Fragment-Based Drug Design